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Olivet Nazarene University to open satellite campus at Young School

News Release

Homer CCSD 33C

Goodings Grove   Luther J. Schilling   William E. Young   William J. Butler

Hadley Middle   Homer Jr. High

 

Contact: Charla Brautigam, Communications/Public Relations Manager

cbrautigam@homerschools.org | 708-226-7628

 

 

For Immediate Release:

Jan. 27, 2016

 

Olivet Nazarene University to open satellite campus at Young School

 

Homer Community Consolidated School District 33C is teaming up with the Village of Homer Glen to bring an institute of higher learning to the community.

 

Superintendent Kara Coglianese announced at the school board meeting on Jan. 26 that the school district and village are entering into an agreement with Olivet Nazarene University to open a satellite campus here in Homer Glen.

 

“This is an exciting partnership for the entire Homer community,” said Coglianese. “Not only will residents have an opportunity to further their education at a highly-esteemed university near their homes, but Homer 33C will be able to expand its professional development opportunities for staff.”

 

The university, which operates a campus in Bourbonnais, offers programs in education, nursing and business at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

 

Its satellite campus at Young School will offer such programs as:

  • Master of Arts in Education: Reading Specialist
  • Master of Arts in Education: Curriculum and Instruction
  • Bachelor of Business Administration
  • Bachelor of Applied Science in Management
  • Teacher Leader Endorsement
  • English as a Second Language Endorsement
  • Master of Business Administration (MBA)
  • Master of Organizational Leadership

 

All classes will be held in the evenings and not interfere with Homer 33C classes and programs.

 

In exchange for Olivet Nazarene University using Young School as a satellite campus, Homer 33C employees (as well as Village of Homer Glen employees) will enjoy a 20 percent discount on tuition. Those pursuing doctorates will receive a 10 percent discount.

 

“I’m very excited about this partnership,” said Homer Glen Mayor George Yukich, who attended the board meeting to sign the partnership agreement with Coglianese and Don Perry, senior director of admissions for Olivet Nazarene University.

 

Homer Glen already has a strong high school and grade school system, said Yukich. Now it has a college.

 

“We’ve got it all,” he added.

 

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Source: Will County News

Homer 33C receives Dart Foundation grant

News Release

Homer CCSD 33C

Goodings Grove   Luther J. Schilling   William E. Young   William J. Butler

Hadley Middle   Homer Jr. High

 

Contact: Charla Brautigam, Communications/Public Relations Manager

cbrautigam@homerschools.org | 708-226-7628

 

 

 

For Immediate Release:

Jan. 28, 2016

 

Homer 33C receives Dart Foundation grant

 

Thanks to a Homer 33C parent and the Dart Foundation, Homer Junior High School is able to update its industrial technology curriculum to include more STEM-integrated learning opportunities.

The Foundation recently notified the district that Homer Junior High had been selected to receive $5,000 grant.

 

“A big `thank you’ to the Dart Foundation and the Scholl family,” said industrial arts teacher Phil Ackland who shared the good news with the Board of Education on Jan. 26.

 

He credited the family for alerting him to the Dart Foundation opportunity and serving as an advocate for the district.

 

Homer Junior High received the good news in late December.

 

With the $5,000 grant, teachers and administrators plan to purchase a 3D printer, CNC machine and equipment for a pneumatic/hydraulics unit for the school’s industrial technology program.

 

The equipment will foster problem-solving and critical-thinking skills, said Ackland, by having students create prototypes after identifying a problem, exploring their options and designing a solution.

 

Past designs have included lighted key chains, earbud holders, phone charging stands and clip-on book lights.

“It’s a great learning experience,” said Ackland.

 

“We’re addressing what’s been called `America’s persistent problem’ — not having enough skilled workers,” added Homer Junior High Principal Troy Mitchell.

 

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Source: Will County News

Homer 33C evaluating PARCC data Setting goals for 2016-17 school year

News Release

Homer CCSD 33C

Goodings Grove   Luther J. Schilling   William E. Young   William J. Butler

Hadley Middle   Homer Jr. High

 

Contact: Charla Brautigam, Communications/Public Relations Manager

cbrautigam@homerschools.org | 708-226-7628

 

 

 

For Immediate Release:

Jan. 28, 2016

 

Homer 33C evaluating PARCC data

Setting goals for 2016-17 school year

 

Homer Community Consolidated School District 33C students continue to perform well on state achievement exams, scoring significantly higher than the state average.

 

According to the most recent PARCC scores:

  • 50 percent of Homer 33C students are proficient or meeting state standards in English Language Arts. The state average is 38 percent.
  • 45 percent of Homer 33C students are proficient or meeting state standards in Math. The state average is 28 percent.

The results were shared at a recent school board meeting; parents were sent individual reports with their child’s report card on Jan. 25.

 

Even though the scores are significantly higher than the state average, Homer 33C administrators are now analyzing the data — reviewing scores by grade level from each of the district’s six schools — to determine how they can improve.

 

Each school has a School Improvement Team that is charged with reviewing the data and coming up with a plan for improvement for their school and district.

 

Their plans can be found on the Homer 33C website under the School Report Cards tab.

 

Among the goals listed by individual School Improvement Teams are:

  • Providing professional development in differentiated instruction and common planning time to review data and discuss instructional strategies to drive instruction
  • Offering elective classes focused on Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math (STEAM)
  • Offering an after-school assistance program
  • Creating a school-wide critical thinking activity that fosters teamwork, problem-solving, creativity, analysis and reflection
  • Promoting home-school partnerships through Curriculum Nights, Parent-Teacher Conferences, school-wide activities and parent/community communication

 

Since this was the first year that Illinois schools administered the PARCC exam, they do not have any prior data to compare it with when reviewing the scores.

 

The ISAT exam had been the barometer for student achievement in the past and differed in content. The PARCC assessment is in math and the English Language Arts, focusing on problem-solving, critical thinking, application and writing.

 

In addition, the format for the upcoming PARCC assessment (spring 2016) has been changed, said Kathleen Robinson, assistant superintendent for instruction. The two windows have been collapsed into one, reducing the amount of time students are in testing. As a result, the 2015 PARCC results cannot serve as a benchmark.

 

“It’s going to be several years before we have enough PARCC data to study trends and see how students are progressing year to year,” she added.

 

In the meantime, Homer 33C administrators plan to continue using local assessments to track student progress and set district goals.

 

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Source: Will County News

Rep. Margo Mc Dermed talks Illinois issues

Margo McDermed

House off to a Stuttering Start

House session was cancelled earlier in the month by Speaker Madigan who bafflingly cited a “lack of workload”. We’ll meet for the first time in 2016 this week on January 27th, the same day that Governor Rauner is to give his State of the State address to the General Assembly. 2016 is an election year and the tendency by leadership can be to put off tough votes until after the primaries in March. The legislative calendar, as set by Speaker Madigan, does not have us in session regularly until April; we are only scheduled to be in Springfield for 2 days in January, 5 in February, and 3 in March. It’s disappointing given how much work we still need to do to compromise on the budget and necessary reforms. In the meantime, rank and file legislators have been at work drafting bills before the deadline last Friday. Generally in the second year of the term (99th General Assembly), fewer bills are filed.Criminal Justice Reform Task Force Needs More Time

Upon taking office, Governor Rauner made it one of his goals to reduce the state’s prison population by 25 percent within the next decade. At one point, there was an estimated 49,000 inmates in a system designed to house 32,000. Through executive order, he established a task force to reform the state’s criminal justice system and sentencing practices. The group that was assembled is comprised of legislators, lawyers, judges, police, prison administrators, professors, and a community activist. The task force was supposed to present a final report at the end of last year, but unsurprisingly given that they are tackling such a large and complex issue, they’re asking for more time. The task force has released its initial recommendations, with a final report expected to be delivered to the governor in March.
The governor’s goal is a lofty one. There is a lot of bipartisan agreement on the need for reform with regards to low-level, nonviolent crimes, but some proposed measures may be more difficult for legislators and citizens to swallow, such as reforming sentences for violent crimes. NPR Illinois provides some information on the unique challenges for the task force, which can be read here. Hopefully these issues and the recommendations of the task force can be addressed legislatively by the General Assembly before the end of the spring session.Rauner Presents Proposals

This week Governor Rauner presented proposals which would impact CPS and the pension system.The CPS proposal comes amid reports from the Better Government Association that the system doesn’t know what happened to much of the equipment from the 50 schools Mayor Emanuel closed two years ago and a another decline in CPS’s bond rating by Fitch.
Senate Republican Leader Christine Radogno and House Republican Leader Jim Durkin filed legislation last Wednesday which would add CPS to an already existing law that allows the state to intervene in financially dire school districts. That legislation, which included every state school district except CPS, outlines a process for the Illinois State Board of Education to establish an Independent Authority to run the school district and remove the current school board. The legislation proposed Wednesday would also create an elected school board in Chicago once the district is no longer in financial difficulty. The current Chicago Board of Education serves by appointment of the mayor.
As the state’s pension crisis continues to worsen (unfunded liability now sits at $113 billion), Governor Rauner also proposed pension reform, which mirrors legislation from Senate President Cullerton. Under this proposal, the State would narrowly define wages in the Illinois Labor Relations Act to exclude any future salary increases as pensionable. Eligible individuals would be then able to examine their personal financial circumstances and the circumstances of their families, to irrevocably decide whether they would like to keep a 3% compounded cost-of-living adjustment and forfeit future wage increases as part of their pension calculation, or move to a lower cost-of-living adjustment (lesser of 3% simple or ½ CPI) and use all future wage increases for purposes of a pension calculation.

Margo McDermed
Margo McDermed
http://www.repmcdermed.com/

Source: Will County News