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What Corey Lewandowski’s Arrest Says about Trump’s Leadership

What Corey Lewandowski’s Arrest Says about Trump’s Leadership

“This speaks to leadership. Leaders set the standards for their organizations and then they hold their organizations accountable to those standards.”

Kathleen Murphy of the Illinois Opportunity Project appeared on FOX Chicago yesterday morning to discuss the battery charges against Donald Trump’s campaign manager. Watch the interview here http://www.upstream-ideas.com/ideas/kathleen-murphy-on/

Source: Will County News

TOP 25 LARGEST SURPLUS- AND DEFICIT-SPENDING ILLINOIS SCHOOL DISTRICTS IN 2016

TOP 25 LARGEST SURPLUS- AND DEFICIT-SPENDING ILLINOIS SCHOOL DISTRICTS IN 2016

Deficit Spending

Nearly 60 percent of Illinois school districts are expected to be deficit spending during fiscal year 2016, according to new data from the Illinois State Board of Education.

In FY15, school districts issued $307.2 million in new debt in their operating funds, a decrease of $49.3 million from $356.5 million in FY14. While that’s almost a 14 percent drop over the year, the board of education says the majority of districts continue to rely on borrowing to generate cash flow.

Screen Shot 2016-03-23 at 4.31.27 PM

Based on revenue and expenditure projections submitted by school districts for their FY16 budgets, the number of districts operating with deficits will increase slightly to 499 (58.6 percent) from 490 (57.2 percent) in FY15, according to the board’s recently released School District Financial Profile Scores report. Deficit spending is calculated by analyzing a district’s four main operational funds: educational, operation and maintenance, student transportation and working cash.

School district deficit spending

Following are the 25 largest surplus- and deficit-spending school districts in FY16. The number of schools and students enrolled in each district as well as the operating expense per pupil (OEPP) are from Illinois Report Card. Cash reserves figures are from districts’ 2015 annual financial reports and show the total amount in unreserved funds as of June 30, 2015.

Largest deficit-spending Illinois school districts.

Top 25 districts with largest projected surplus spending in FY16 

25. Joliet PSD 86 

  • Projected surplus spending: $2.07 million
  • Schools: 19
  • Enrollment: 11,781
  • OEPP: $10,254
  • Cash reserves: $55.05 million

24. Skokie SD 69

  • Projected surplus spending: $2.10 million
  • Schools: 3
  • Enrollment: 1,780
  • OEPP: $11,763
  • Cash reserves: $32.71 million

23. Barrington CUSD 220 

  • Projected surplus spending: $2.10 million
  • Schools: 11
  • Enrollment: 8,910
  • OEPP: $16,178
  • Cash reserves: $48.17 million

22. Evergreen Park CHSD 231

  • Projected surplus spending: $2.51 million
  • Schools: 1
  • Enrollment: 856
  • OEPP: $17,063
  • Cash reserves: $17.08 million

21. Belleville Twp HSD 201 

  • Projected surplus spending: $2.55 million
  • Schools: 2
  • Enrollment: 4,827
  • OEPP: $11,574
  • Cash reserves: $2.34 million

20. CHSD 99 | Downers Grove 

  • Projected surplus spending: $2.64 million
  • Schools: 2
  • Enrollment: 5,015
  • OEPP: $16,314
  • Cash reserves: $2.15 million

19. Glenbard Twp HSD 87 | Glen Ellyn 

  • Projected surplus spending: $2.78 million
  • Schools: 4
  • Enrollment: 8,288
  • OEPP: $15,414
  • Cash reserves: $87.61 million

18. Bluford Unit School District 318 

  • Projected surplus spending: $2.79 million
  • Schools: n/a
  • Enrollment: n/a
  • OEPP: n/a
  • Cash reserves: n/a

17. East St. Louis SD 189

  • Projected surplus spending: $2.80 million
  • Schools: 10
  • Enrollment: 6,116
  • OEPP: $13,198
  • Cash reserves: $36.13 million

16. New Lenox SD 122

  • Projected surplus spending: $2.91 million
  • Schools: 11
  • Enrollment: 5,357
  • OEPP: $10,257
  • Cash reserves: $27.13 million

15. Glen Ellyn SD 41

  • Projected surplus spending: $2.94 million
  • Schools: 5
  • Enrollment: 3,451
  • OEPP: $12,929
  • Cash reserves: $13.05 million

14. Crystal Lake CCSD 47

  • Projected surplus spending: $3.12 million
  • Schools: 12
  • Enrollment: 7,765
  • OEPP: $10,267
  • Cash reserves: $43.54 million

13. Reed Custer CUSD 255U | Braidwood 

  • Projected surplus spending: $3.19 million
  • Schools: 4
  • Enrollment: 1,631
  • OEPP: $13,262
  • Cash reserves: $20.65 million

12. Park Ridge CCSD 64

  • Projected surplus spending: $3.25 million
  • Schools: 8
  • Enrollment: 4,555
  • OEPP: $15,152
  • Cash reserves: $56.89 million

11. Channahon SD 17

  • Projected surplus spending: $3.35 million
  • Schools: 4
  • Enrollment: 1,285
  • OEPP: $9,910
  • Cash reserves: $34.58 million

10. Valley View CUSD 365U | Romeoville 

  • Projected surplus spending: $3.35 million
  • Schools: 19
  • Enrollment: 17,318
  • OEPP: $12,028
  • Cash reserves: $70.96 million

9. Plainfield SD 202

  • Projected surplus spending: $3.41 million
  • Schools: 28
  • Enrollment: 28,116
  • OEPP: $9,344
  • Cash reserves: $72.90 million

8. Adlai E. Stevenson HSD 125 | Lincolnshire 

  • Projected surplus spending: $3.60 million
  • Schools: 1
  • Enrollment: 3,906
  • OEPP: $18,778
  • Cash reserves: $123.96 million

7. Twp HSD 113 | Highland Park 

  • Projected surplus spending: $4.05 million
  • Schools: 2
  • Enrollment: 3,683
  • OEPP: $24,848
  • Cash reserves: $100.20 million

6. Oswego CUSD 308

  • Projected surplus spending: $4.57 million
  • Schools: 21
  • Enrollment: 17,911
  • OEPP: $9,192
  • Cash reserves: $53.98 million

5. Naperville CUSD 203

  • Projected surplus spending: $5.20 million
  • Schools: 21
  • Enrollment: 16,917
  • OEPP: $14,175
  • Cash reserves: $154.82 million

4. Urbana SD 116

  • Projected surplus spending: $6.04 million
  • Schools: 8
  • Enrollment: 4,418
  • OEPP: $13,512
  • Cash reserves: $18.35 million

3. Township HSD 214 | Arlington Heights 

  • Projected surplus spending: $7.86 million
  • Schools: 6
  • Enrollment: 11,974
  • OEPP: $19,734
  • Cash reserves: $159.34 million

2. CUSD 300 | Algonquin 

  • Projected surplus spending: $10.23 million
  • Schools: 25
  • Enrollment: 20,862
  • OEPP: $10,128
  • Cash reserves: $90.35 million

1. Niles Twp CHSD 219 | Skokie 

  • Projected surplus spending: $10.43 million
  • Schools: 2
  • Enrollment: 4,752
  • OEPP: $22,340
  • Cash reserves: $183.68 million

Top 25 districts with largest projected deficit spending in FY16

25. Kankakee SD 111

  • Projected deficit spending: $3.52 million
  • Schools: 11
  • Enrollment: 5,470
  • OEPP: $12,200
  • Cash reserves: $11.48 million

24. Bloom Twp HSD 206 | Chicago Heights 

  • Projected deficit spending: $3.54 million
  • Schools: 2
  • Enrollment: 3,245
  • OEPP: $15,200
  • Cash reserves: $17.42 million

23. Peotone CUSD 207U

  • Projected deficit spending: $3.65 million
  • Schools: 4
  • Enrollment: 1,606
  • OEPP: $10,929
  • Cash reserves: $9.27 million

22. Lincolnwood SD 74

  • Projected deficit spending: $3.70 million
  • Schools: 3
  • Enrollment: 1,240
  • OEPP: $16,651
  • Cash reserves: $26.81 million

21. Chicago Heights SD 170

  • Projected deficit spending: $3.75 million
  • Schools: 9
  • Enrollment: 3,323
  • OEPP: $13,361
  • Cash reserves: $23.41 million

20. Hawthorn CCSD 73 | Vernon Hills 

  • Projected deficit spending: $3.84 million
  • Schools: 7
  • Enrollment: 4,083
  • OEPP: $13,157
  • Cash reserves: $41.64 million

19. Edwardsville CUSD 7

  • Projected deficit spending: $3.88 million
  • Schools: 13
  • Enrollment: 7,551
  • OEPP: $9,064
  • Cash reserves: $1.30 million

18. Leyden CHSD 212 | Franklin Park 

  • Projected deficit spending: $3.89 million
  • Schools: 2
  • Enrollment: 3,423
  • OEPP: $18,339
  • Cash reserves: $102.47 million

17. Galesburg CUSD 205

  • Projected deficit spending: $3.96 million
  • Schools: 8
  • Enrollment: 4,573
  • OEPP: $8,621
  • Cash reserves: $16.87 million

16. Reavis Twp HSD 220 | Burbank 

  • Projected deficit spending: $4.22 million
  • Schools: 1
  • Enrollment: 1,866
  • OEPP: $16,542
  • Cash reserves: $11.76 million

15. Comm Cons SD 59 | Arlington Heights 

  • Projected deficit spending: $4.42 million
  • Schools: 14
  • Enrollment: 7,010
  • OEPP: $15,036
  • Cash reserves: $134.05 million

14. Bremen CHSD 228 | Midlothian 

  • Projected deficit spending: $4.66 million
  • Schools: 4
  • Enrollment: 5,196
  • OEPP: $14,622
  • Cash reserves: $58.59 million

13. Calumet City SD 155

  • Projected deficit spending: $4.66 million
  • Schools: 3
  • Enrollment: 1,219
  • OEPP: $14,062
  • Cash reserves: $9.20 million

12. CHSD 218 | Oak Lawn 

  • Projected deficit spending: $5.12 million
  • Schools: 3
  • Enrollment: 5,508
  • OEPP: $18,008
  • Cash reserves: $75.78 million

11. Lincoln Way CHSD 210 | New Lenox 

  • Projected deficit spending: $5.24 million
  • Schools: 4
  • Enrollment: 7,126
  • OEPP: $13,225
  • Cash reserves: $540,868

10. Oak Park ESD 97

  • Projected deficit spending: $5.57 million
  • Schools: 10
  • Enrollment: 5,950
  • OEPP: $12,963
  • Cash reserves: $29.87 million

9. Oak Park-River Forest SD 200

  • Projected deficit spending: $6.51 million
  • Schools: 1
  • Enrollment: 3,294
  • OEPP: $20,838
  • Cash reserves: $98.62 million

8. Morton CUSD 709

  • Projected deficit spending: $6.62 million
  • Schools: 6
  • Enrollment: 2,911
  • OEPP: $9,881
  • Cash reserves: $31.25 million

7. Kildeer Countryside CCSD 96 

  • Projected deficit spending: $7.01 million
  • Schools: 7
  • Enrollment: 3,140
  • OEPP: $14,176
  • Cash reserves: $94.11 million

6. Peoria SD 150

  • Projected deficit spending: $7.81 million
  • Schools: 24
  • Enrollment: 13,675
  • OEPP: $13,662
  • Cash reserves: $47.26 million

5. Thornton Twp HSD 205 | South Holland 

  • Projected deficit spending: $8.19 million
  • Schools: 3
  • Enrollment: 5,079
  • OEPP: $19,584
  • Cash reserves: $38.72 million

4. Cicero SD 99

  • Projected deficit spending: $9.31 million
  • Schools: 15
  • Enrollment: 12,857
  • OEPP: $9,506
  • Cash reserves: $179.61 million

3. Maine Township HSD 207 | Park Ridge 

  • Projected deficit spending: $11.67 million
  • Schools: 3
  • Enrollment: 6,307
  • OEPP: $18,722
  • Cash reserves: $62.72 million

2. SD U-46 | Elgin 

  • Projected deficit spending: $18.33 million
  • Schools: 54
  • Enrollment: 40,400
  • OEPP: $10,672
  • Cash reserves: $191.60 million

1. City of Chicago SD 299

  • Projected deficit spending: $69.70 million
  • Schools: 565
  • Enrollment: 397,833
  • OEPP: $15,120
  • Cash reserves: $180.27 million

More from ISBE:

School districts submit a deficit reduction plan if their budgets are not balanced and they do not have an adequate fund balance to sustain the deficit. An adequate fund balance is defined as an ending fund balance that is three times the deficit amount. For example, if a district incurred a deficit of $100,000, it would be required to submit a deficit reduction plan if the ending fund balance was less than $300,000.

Of the 499 districts that project that they will incur deficits in FY 2016, 49 school districts were required to submit a deficit reduction plan. ISBE staff will continue to monitor these school districts. Staff is reviewing to ensure that all school districts required to submit a deficit reduction plan have done so. After a thorough review, staff will report districts that meet the criteria for certification in financial difficulty.

 

Source: Will County News

Illinois inn fined for refusing to host gay civil union ceremony

Tue Mar 29, 2016 12:36pm EDT

Illinois inn fined for refusing to host gay civil union ceremony

 Illinois Christian Businessman Fined $80k for His Faith

An Illinois inn that refused to allow a same-sex couple hold their civil union ceremony on the property was fined more than $80,000 by the Illinois Human Rights Commission on Tuesday.

An administrative law judge with the commission ordered TimberCreek Bed & Breakfast to pay $15,000 each to Todd and Mark Wathen for emotional distress.

The Wathens had contacted TimberCreek in 2011 as they looked for possible locations for the ceremony.

TimberCreek owner Jim Walder had responded to the Wathens’ inquiry with an email that said “homosexuality is immoral and unnatural,” according to the American Civil Liberties Union of Illinois.

TimberCreek, located about 100 miles south of Chicago, must also pay $50,000 in attorneys’ fees and $1,218.35 in costs.

“We are very happy that no other couple will have to experience what we experienced by being turned away and belittled and criticized for who we are,” Todd Wathen said in a statement.

A representative from TimberCreek was not immediately available to comment.

The U.S. Supreme Court legalized same-sex marriage in June 2015.

Source: Will County News

Get some exercise while raising money for Hadley, Homer students

News Release

Homer CCSD 33C

Goodings Grove   Luther J. Schilling   William E. Young   William J. Butler

Hadley Middle   Homer Jr. High

 

Contact: Charla Brautigam, Communications/Public Relations Manager

cbrautigam@homerschools.org | 708-226-7628

 

For Immediate Release:

March 31, 2016

 

Get some exercise while raising money for Hadley, Homer students

 

Lace up those running shoes. The Homer Middle School/Hadley Junior High School Parent Teacher Organizations (PTO) are sponsoring a Mustang Color Run in Lockport.

 

The 5K Color Run/Walk will be held Sunday, April 24 at Dellwood Park. The event is open to the community.

 

“We want this to be a fun, family event for the entire community,” said PTO volunteer Angela Adolf.

 

Registration is $30 per participant with proceeds benefitting students at Homer Junior High and Hadley Middle School in the form of classroom supplies, assemblies, technology needs and school improvements.

 

The goal is to raise $20,000.

 

Students are currently circulating pledge sheets while parents are soliciting donations and sponsorships from community businesses.

 

Mayor George Yukich has agreed to serve as the master of ceremonies while the Homer Junior High will sing the National Anthem.

 

Participants may either join the 5K Mustang Color Run at 9:30 a.m. or the shorter 2K Mustang Buddies Color Run at 9 a.m.

 

To register online, visit the PTO’s webpage here (http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07ecd0bs3dd99f0e61&llr=fuofyzwab) or call 708-296-0857 for more information. Discounts are available for teams of four or more.

 

Those who preregister will receive a goodie bag with an event T-shirt, color packet (to coat themselves in colorful powder) and sunglasses.

 

Runners/walkers may also register the day of the event for $35 per participant. They will not be guaranteed a goodie bag, however.

 

Source: Will County News

Young School Homer 33C students make contact with garden pals in Uganda

News Release

Homer CCSD 33C

Goodings Grove   Luther J. Schilling   William E. Young   William J. Butler

Hadley Middle   Homer Jr. High

 

Contact: Charla Brautigam, Communications/Public Relations Manager

cbrautigam@homerschools.org | 708-226-7628

 

 

For Immediate Release:

March 30, 2016

 

Young School students make contact with garden pals in Uganda

 

   Students in Karen Kraynak’s fourth-grade class and Lisa Estes’ third-grade class are anxious to hear back from their new friends in Uganda.

 

The students, who were selected to participate in a Global Garden Exchange program with students in Uganda, recently sent their first note off to their “sister school.”

 

“A BIG hello to our sister school, St. Peter’s Mateete Primary School in Mateete, Uganda,” students wrote. “We are so very happy to have the opportunity to share our love of gardening with you across the world in Africa.”

 

Students plan to share gardening ideas and techniques with their new friends in Uganda. They will be using their measurement, problem-solving and research skills to grow fruits and vegetables from seed and share their progress with fourth- and fifth-grade students at St. Peter’s Mateete Primary School.

 

“We are 56 students from William E. Young Elementary School in Homer Glen, IL USA,” students told their new garden pals. “Our nearest big city is Chicago, IL, which you may locate on a map.  Mrs. Estes’s third graders and Mrs. Kraynak’s fourth graders are working on this project together.

 

“Next week, we will begin planting seeds indoors in small peat pots,” they continued. “We are nearing the end of our winter, but we are nowhere near to planting outside. We could still see temperatures below freezing levels. We want to give our plants a head start by planting them indoors and transplanting them out in our garden at the end of April.  We have a very short growing season, May-October, so we hope to get as much as we can from our garden at Young School. How long is your growing season?”

 

Young School students were paired with the school in Mateete by Slow Food USA, a global, grassroots organization that practices small-scale and sustainable production of quality food around the world.

 

The goal is to reconnect youth with their food by teaching them how to grow, cook and enjoy real food.

 

Students will be emailing each other, sharing information about their growing seasons and photos of their gardens.

 

“We will grow tomatoes, potatoes, green beans, cucumbers, radishes, strawberries, and some flowers that will keep pests away from our garden,” students told their new friends in Mateete. “We are wondering what crops you plan on growing this year?”

 

They concluded: “We can’t wait to hear back from you!”

 

Like us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/homer33c?fref=ts&ref=br_tf

 

Source: Will County News

Abducted Indian Priest, Who Worked For Mother Teresa’s Missionaries Of Charity, Crucified By ISIS

http://www.indiatimes.com/news/world/abducted-indian-catholic-priest-father-tom-uzhunnalil-part-of-mother-teresa-s-missionaries-of-charity-crucified-by-the-islamic-state-on-good-friday-252617.html

While Indians were celebrating the hard fought win over Austrailia, Pakistanis were reeling after a bomb ripped through an amusement park in Lahore and left scores dead; mostly innocent children and women.

priest-crucified-father-tom-uzhunnil_1459150187_1024x477

But that was not the worse of news over the weekend, many international agencies are now reporting that Father Tom Uzhunnalil, a catholic priest from Kerala who worked with Mother Teresa’s Missionaries Of Charity, was crucified by ISIS on Good Friday.

He was kidnapped in Yemen in earlier this month during a raid on a nursing home run by Missionaries of Charity. 16 nurses and nuns were also killed in this raid.

His execution by the Islamist sect, using the same method used by the Romans on Jesus and marked on Good Friday every year, was confirmed at the Easter Vigil Mass by Cardinal Christoph Schonborn of Vienna, The Washington Times reported.

 

Flying for the first time can be a daunting for anybody, which led a 50-year-old woman to deploy an emergency exit slide when she thought the emergency exit door was another washroom to relieve herself.

 

The China Southern flight bound from the Chinese city of Chongqing to Shenzhen was delayed by two hours. Many passengers panicked as there was a hissing noise, while other took to recording the incident on the social media platform, Weibo.

 

Although Chinese Civil Aviation Law consider endangering aircraft safety a criminal offence, investigators are still looking into matter. The woman who caused the incident was looking to avoid the long queue for the toilet set off chaos just before take off.

 

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Source: Will County News

New Jersey actor faces prison for prop gun

New Jersey nonsense: Actor faces 10 years in prison for using a prop gun in movie

POSTED AT 12:01 PM ON MARCH 24, 2016 BY ED MORRISSEY

How insane are New Jersey’s gun laws? Governor Chris Christie has had to issue two general pardons in order to stop or reverse gross miscarriages of justice over nonsensical prosecutions. Will Christie go for the hat trick? Carlo Goias had better hope so, before he does a ten-year stretch in prison because he used a pellet gun while making a film in the Garden State:

 

Carlo Goias, whose stage name is Carlo Bellario, was charged under New Jersey’s strict gun law. It requires permits for firearms, including the airsoft gun Goias used while filming a car chase scene.

Goias rejected a plea deal offer Tuesday that could have sent him to jail for less than a year. He faces up to a decade behind bars because of prior felony convictions that prosecutors say include theft and burglary.

“I was shooting a movie — I wasn’t committing a crime intentionally,” Goias recently told The Associated Press. “Robert De Niro doesn’t ask Marty Scorsese is if he has gun permits. We’re actors. That’s for the production company to worry about.”

Some state lawmakers say the case highlights the need for New Jersey to change its gun laws.

 

Some say? It’s true that Goias hasn’t exactly been an angel, and with his record, no state would allow him to possess firearms. However, in other states, no one would have accused Goias of doing so. A pellet gun does not use gunpowder, so it’s not a firearm — except in New Jersey. The Airsoft gun Goias had doesn’t even fire metal pellets — it fires nonlethal plastic pellets under power of compressed air. It’s a prop, not a threat.

More to the point, it would be clear to anyone except a New Jersey prosecutor that there was not only no criminal intent, there was no danger of a crime at all. Goias was acting in a low-budget film, not participating in a heist. The production startled some in the neighborhood, who misunderstood what was happening and called the police. Instead of recognizing this as a misunderstanding, the police arrested Goias, who then got held in jail for four days while his friends and family tried to raise enough money to meet the $10,000 bail demand.

Four days in jail. For using a non-lethal air-powered pellet gun. While making a movie. And the case is hardly over — the district attorney plans on prosecuting Goias for felony possession of a firearm to send him back to prison. Goias, who at least had been trying to become a productive member of society, might end up stuck in the criminal cycle for the rest of his life because he took a part in a low-budget movie.

Clearly, no film production company of any size should ever do business in New Jersey. And just as clearly, the state’s legislature should take action to put an end to these insane prosecutions of people who have no intent to commit any crime at all. In the meantime, though, Christie should get his pardon pen at the ready to put an end to this injustice, too — if he hasn’t packed it up along with his presidential aspirations.

Source: Will County News

North Carolina passes bathroom privacy law

North Carolina passes bathroom privacy law

POSTED AT 2:01 PM ON MARCH 24, 2016 BY JAZZ SHAW

Last month we covered the new rules in Charlotte, North Carolina which would force businesses and public facilities to open their bathrooms, locker rooms and showers to anyone based on the gender they “identify as” rather than their natural chromosomal structure. At the time, Governor Pat McCrory indicated that moving forward with such a plan to please the Social Justice Warriors would result in action by the state government. Well, that day arrived rather quickly. (Washington Post)

The North Carolina legislature on Wednesday passed a sweeping bill overturning gay and transgender protections at the local level and requiring students to use public restrooms that correspond to their biological sex.

Gov. Pat McCrory, a former Charlotte mayor, signed the bill hours later, according to the Associated Press.

State lawmakers pushed the measure in response to a nondiscrimination ordinance adopted in the city of Charlotte that, among other things, allowed people to use the bathroom that matched with their gender identity. Legislators said immediate action was necessary to protect children and women from sexual predators who might pose as transgender to gain access to women’s restrooms.

As is usual in most of these cases, the coverage provided by Sandhya Somashekhar at the Post is as blatantly biased as it could possibly be. The article is peppered with all of the usual buzzwords and phrases, such as “gay and transgender protections” rather than addressing the real issues at hand. As I noted last month, the Charlotte ordinance didn’t even mention any actual protections, such as preventing discrimination in employment or related areas, focusing solely on the favorite menu items of the Social Justice Warriors; namely trying to force their choices on the rest of society regardless of accepted standards of privacy.

There was also no hint of compromise in the ordinance, which could have been accomplished simply by insisting that single use, unisex facilities be provided. (It’s an expensive solution which can be crippling to small businesses, but it would have at least provided options.) Instead, the city chose to mandate the opening of women’s bathrooms, locker rooms and showers to any male who chose to claim to be a woman. The locals were having none of it and now the state has taken action to prevent such mandates even in the face of politically correct boycott threats.

Rather than yet again dwelling on the social disorder surrounding these maneuvers by liberal advocates, we should probably focus on the science behind it. (A crazy idea, I know.) The American College of Pediatricians (ACP) recently released a new set of guidelines which hammer home the fundamental difference between the genders and how these questions need to be dealt with. Here are a couple of the key takeaways.

1. Human sexuality is an objective biological binary trait: “XY” and “XX” are genetic markers of health – not genetic markers of a disorder. The norm for human design is to be conceived either male or female. Human sexuality is binary by design with the obvious purpose being the reproduction and flourishing of our species. This principle is self-evident. The exceedingly rare disorders of sex development (DSDs), including but not limited to testicular feminization and congenital adrenal hyperplasia, are all medically identifiable deviations from the sexual binary norm, and are rightly recognized as disorders of human design. Individuals with DSDs do not constitute a third sex.1

2. No one is born with a gender. Everyone is born with a biological sex. Gender (an awareness and sense of oneself as male or female) is a sociological and psychological concept; not an objective biological one. No one is born with an awareness of themselves as male or female; this awareness develops over time and, like all developmental processes, may be derailed by a child’s subjective perceptions, relationships, and adverse experiences from infancy forward. People who identify as “feeling like the opposite sex” or “somewhere in between” do not comprise a third sex. They remain biological men or biological women.2,3,4

The ACP is a smaller professional association than the American Academy of Pediatrics, but the group of doctors involved formed largely in response to the dangerous trends in their profession where medical professionals have begun kowtowing to pressure from the SJW movement and speaking their language even when it presents risks to patients. They obviously focus primarily on the needs of at risk children, but the fundamental information available at the link applies to people of all ages and should be kept in mind as our legislative and legal systems wrestle with this debate.

UPDATE:

The Governor released the following statement along with the signing of the bill.

“The basic expectation of privacy in the most personal of settings, a restroom or locker room, for each gender was violated by government overreach and intrusion by the mayor and city council of Charlotte. This radical breach of trust and security under the false argument of equal access not only impacts the citizens of Charlotte but people who come to Charlotte to work, visit or play. This new government regulation defies common sense and basic community norms by allowing, for example, a man to use a woman’s bathroom, shower or locker room.

“While local municipalities have important priorities working to oversee police, fire, water and sewer, zoning, roads, and transit, the mayor and city council took action far out of its core responsibilities. As a result, I have signed legislation passed by a bipartisan majority to stop this breach of basic privacy and etiquette which was to go into effect April 1. Although other items included in this bill should have waited until regular session, this bill does not change existing rights under state or federal law.

“It is now time for the city of Charlotte elected officials and state elected officials to get back to working on the issues most important to our citizens.”

Source: Will County News

Daily Dose of Chicago Corruption

Daily Dose of Chicago Corruption

 

2/23/16 – Circuit Court rules against city of Chicago affirming the city violated the due process rights of tens of thousands of motorists ticketed by the city’s red light cameras since 2003. Chicago taxpayers are now on the hook to pay tens of millions of dollars in refunds to victims. – Chicago Sun Times.

2/24/16 – Chicago Inspector General investigating possible violations of the law by the city’s longest-serving Alderman and the man running Chicago’s $100 million per year workman’s comp fund in secret. – Chicago Sun Times.

2/26/16 – The Chicago Skyway interstate toll has been sold for $2.8 billion to Canadian investors, or $1 billion more than the Chicago City Council sold it for a decade ago for pennies on the dollar. – Chicago Sun Times.

2/28/16 – A friend of the US President and the nephew of the former Chicago Mayor have lost $68 million from a government employee pension fund they were managing. – Chicago Sun Times.

2/28/16 – The Cook County Board President’s former Chief of Staff, the party endorsed candidate for Cook County State’s Attorney, is fined $19,000 by the Illinois Board of Elections for violating campaign finance laws concerning a secret $25,000 donation from the Cook County Board President. – Chicago Sun Times.

3/1/16 – Chicago Teachers Union threatens to go on strike if taxpayers don’t continue to pay the teachers’ own pension contributions that are typically made by the employees, not the taxpayers. – Chicago Sun Times.

3/1/16 – A picture showing suburban Cicero’s Police Chief celebrating with 2 convicted felons is mysteriously removed from the internet after it is discovered by local media. – Chicago Sun Times.

3/2/16 – State Board of Education announces it is investigating the finances of one Chicago school district. – The Herald News.

3/3/16 – The Illinois Secretary of State has collected $2.7 million in fines from 136,101 unsuspecting motorists after the state stopped telling citizens when their automobile license tax is due. – Chicago Sun Times.

3/3/16 – Chicago Police officer is sentenced to 2 years in prison for beating a store clerk. The officer claimed he was attacked by the clerk, but video footage clearly showed it was an unprovoked attack by the officer. – Chicago Sun Times.

3/4/16 – The FBI announced it is investigating a double-murder by a Chicago police officer who claimed he was defending himself, but accidentally killed an innocent neighbor by mistake. – Chicago Sun Times.

3/5/16 – Cook County sues the state of Illinois for failure to reimburse county agencies. – Chicago Sun Times.

3/6/16 – The just-retired Superintendent of a Chicago school district under investigation for its finances is collecting a $312,000 per year pension compliment of taxpayers. – Daily Southtown.

3/7/16 – US Attorney’s office subpoenas suburban Cicero’s records to investigate $890,000 in payments to the daughter of Cicero’s town Trustee. – Better Government Association.

3/8/16 – The candidate challenging an incumbent Chicago State Representative and the challenger’s girlfriend were beaten by a supporter of the Alderman, were hit over the head with a bottle and had a staple gun shot into his forehead. – ABC 7 News.

3/10/16 – The wife of a suburban police officer who recently committed suicide is charged with conspiracy to commit fraud. – Daily Herald.

3/11/16 – City of Chicago sues its former Chicago Public Schools CEO for $65 million. The former CEO has already plead guilty in the bribery and kick-back scandal. – Chicago Sun Times.

 

Source: Will County News

Madigan claims to be the protector of the middle class.

Illinois House Speaker Mike Madigan claims to be the protector of the middle class.

Problem is, the speaker’s definition of “middle class” doesn’t resemble the true makeup of Illinois’ working families. For Madigan, “middle class” means “government workers,” and he prioritizes appeasing government workers over reducing the tax burden and increasing economic opportunities for all Illinoisans.

Just look at his track record. Madigan opposes the very reforms that would benefit Illinois’ middle class most: a property-tax freeze to provide relief from the third-highest property taxes in the nation, term limits for politicians, and economic policies that make the state more business-friendly and create more jobs.

Instead, Madigan wants billions of dollars in tax hikes to feed the state’s unsustainable government-worker pension system, which is $111 billion in debt.

But the best proof of Madigan’s true loyalties lies in his actions surrounding the state’s contract negotiations with the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees.

Madigan wants the private sector to pay for more than $3 billion in state-worker salary, health-insurance and pension benefits under the new AFSCME contract, even as Illinoisans suffer in a state with the nation’s second-worst jobs recovery. AFSCME’s leaders want four-year raises ranging from 11.5 to 29%, a 37.5-hour workweek, five weeks’ vacation and enhanced health care coverage – benefits that are far out of line with what Illinoisans working in the private sector can afford to pay for. Not to mention these additional benefits would come on top of the unsustainable salary growth AFSCME workers have already seen.

Madigan’s influence has led to years of economic hardship for Illinois taxpayers, who are forced to prop up benefits for government workers.

AFSCME’s Cadillac benefits

Over the past decade, state AFSCME worker salaries grew by more than 40%, even as private-sector earnings remained virtually flat.

AFSCME workers also receive other benefits that overburden state taxpayers.

The state, meaning taxpayers, provides government workers generous health insurance plans – often with no deductibles. Government workers also pay for only about 7% of the cost of their coverage, according to a study by The Pew Charitable Trusts, while taxpayers cover the other 93% of state-employee health care costs.

These state-run plans offer the equivalent benefits of a private-sector “platinum” health care plan, the most generous plan available through health care exchanges.

In addition, most state workers get free health care when they retire – a benefit that’s virtually unheard of in the private sector.

For state employees who work more than 20 years, taxpayers pick up virtually 100% of their health insurance during retirement. The current value of those benefits to a state worker equals anywhere from $225,000 to $500,000, depending on when a worker retires.

A decade of private-sector pain

Those generous state-worker benefits were paid for by a middle class that suffered economically from 2003 to 2014 – a decade when Madigan virtually controlled state government. That’s when Madigan had majorities in both legislative chambers and Democratic governors in Rod Blagojevich and Pat Quinn. Their combined legislative agenda – more debt and taxes, a bigger public sector, and the avoidance of structural reforms – remained in full swing until January 2015, when Gov. Bruce Rauner took office.

That 11-year period ushered in one of the worst economic performances of any state in the nation. Under Madigan’s leadership, Illinois’ credit rating was downgraded 16 times, the state’s pension crisis became the worst in the nation, and Illinoisans suffered the nation’s worst post-Great Recession jobs recovery – all while residents faced a record income-tax increase in 2011 and the nation’s second-highest property taxes.

From 2003 to 2014, median household incomes in Illinois actually fell. When taking inflation into account, Illinoisans had to deal with a $3,000 drop in their real incomes.

Illinoisans also saw their source of jobs dry up. Though every neighboring state suffered during the Great Recession, Illinoisans suffered through the worst recovery of any state in the country. Between 2003 and 2014, Illinois employment fell by over 150,000, according to the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics – a far higher number than any of its neighbors.

Much of the pain felt by Illinois’ middle and working classes has been due to the state’s loss of manufacturing jobs. From 2003 to 2014, Illinois lost more than 100,000 manufacturing jobs on net, many to its neighboring states. Higher workers’ compensation costshigh property taxes and an unfriendly business climate have contributed to that collapse.

Illinois’ poor economic performance left more than 16% of state’s residents dependent on food stamps to feed their families, the highest ratio in the Midwest. The number of food stamp recipients in Illinois doubled to more than 2 million from 2003 to 2013.

Despite their economic struggles, Illinoisans were also hit with increased taxes. Illinois property taxes – now among the highest in the nation – rose 45% from 2000 to 2013. And in 2011, Illinois’ politicians passed a record income-tax hike that took $31 billion in additional dollars out of taxpayers’ pockets.

That tax hike, despite politicians’ promises, failed to fix the state’s pension crisis, pay off Illinois’ unpaid bills or spur an economic recovery.

The importance of AFSCME contract negotiations

The next AFSCME contract has deeper implications than simply what costs will be imposed on the state and taxpayers.

What happens with the next AFSCME contract will determine whether Illinois will continue to follow the same failed policies of the status quo or finally enact the reforms needed to bring jobs and growth back to Illinois.

Ironically, Madigan said in December 2015: “I don’t think any government should be in the business of lowering wages and the standard of living.”

He was talking about the AFSCME contract, sticking up for his government-worker “middle class.” But what Madigan refuses to acknowledge is that his agenda of failed policies has had the effect of crushing the state’s true middle- and working-class residents’ wages and growth in Illinois.

Taking care of the middle class means giving it a chance to grow again – and that means Madigan must embrace economic and governmental reforms that make all Illinoisans, not just those in the public sector, more prosperous.


Ted Dabrowski
Vice President of Policy

 

Source: Will County News