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Homer 33C Hadley hosts Family Reading Night

News Release

Homer CCSD 33C

Goodings Grove   Luther J. Schilling   William E. Young   William J. Butler

Hadley Middle   Homer Jr. High

 

Contact: Charla Brautigam, Communications/Public Relations Manager

cbrautigam@homerschools.org | 708-226-7628

For Immediate Release:

Nov. 18, 2016

 

Hadley hosts Family Reading Night

 

Hadley Middle School students and their families enjoyed a magical evening of reading and storytelling Thursday (Nov. 17).

 

Organized by the school’s Family Reading Night Committee, the evening offered Hadley families an opportunity to celebrate the joy of reading together through games and activities, such as Book Quiditch, arts and crafts projects and a PTO Scholastic Bookfaire.

“Family Reading Night is an opportunity for families and Homer Staff to come together and celebrate the power of literacy and the impact that it can and does have on the children that we serve,” said Dawn Scuderi, the library media specialist at Hadley.

 

“Building excitement around the way we engage in stories and informational text that can be shared with parents is always the goal of our teachers and the Homer School Library staff,” she added, “and our Family Reading Night gives the community an event that highlights that.”

Among those participating were Superintendent Kara Coglianese, who shared her love of books and storytelling by reading aloud to groups of children.

 

Accounting Coordinator Deborah Brom brought her licensed comfort dog, Toby, to listen as students took turns reading aloud to him.

 

“We are excited to say that this year we have public librarians, community members, teachers, staff, parents and administrators volunteering their time and resources to give families a night focused on literacy that students look forward to every year,” said Scuderi.

 

“This year we have more volunteers than ever before,” she added. “It is truly wonderful to see so many people support our families and literacy!”

 

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Source: Will County News

Goodings Grove Pumpkin Penny Wars raises $1,795 for Lockport FISH Food Pantry

News Release

Homer CCSD 33C

Goodings Grove   Luther J. Schilling   William E. Young   William J. Butler

Hadley Middle   Homer Jr. High

 

Contact: Charla Brautigam, Communications/Public Relations Manager

cbrautigam@homerschools.org | 708-226-7628

For Immediate Release:

Nov. 17, 2016

 

Goodings Grove Pumpkin Penny Wars raises $1,795 for Lockport FISH Food Pantry

Goodings Grove students proudly donated $1,795 to the Lockport FISH Food Pantry this month, turning over earnings from the school’s Pumpkin Penny Wars.

“We are thrilled Mrs. Christie (the building principal) brought Pumpkin Penny Wars to Goodings Grove,” said teacher Stephanie Piper. “Students and staff enjoy the friendly competition for such a wonderful cause.”

 

Students, teachers and staff collected the money in late October during the friendly battle between each grade level and department, including the main office.

 

Teachers and staff decorated the pumpkins and invited students to “vote” for their favorite one by dropping pennies into the corresponding basket.

 

The pumpkin that collected the most pennies was deemed the winner and earned that grade level the honor of leading the school’s annual Halloween parade.

 

Just to make the competition a little more interesting — and to raise a little more cash for the food pantry — voters were told they could sabotage an opponent by placing silver coins or paper currency in its basket. The coins and paper currency counted against the pennies, putting some pumpkins in the negative.

 

In the end, a Star Wars-themed pumpkin, decorated by the P.E. teachers, music teacher and counselors, earned the most pennies.

 

It was on display as Jim Naylor, president of the Lockport FISH Food Pantry, stopped by the school Nov. 16 to collect the earnings.

 

“Thank you,” he told students. “This is a special thing you guys did. You are helping out a lot of people.”

 

He went on to explain the Lockport FISH Food Pantry is operated by volunteers and assists between 200 and 300 families each month.

 

“We go out and buy food for people who don’t have enough,” he told students, including fresh fruits, breads and meat.

 

The pantry is open Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. For more information, visit www.lockportfoodpantry.org.

 

 

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Source: Will County News

Schilling School teachers, staff join Ronald McDonald at McCare Night

News Release

Homer CCSD 33C

Goodings Grove   Luther J. Schilling   William E. Young   William J. Butler

Hadley Middle   Homer Jr. High

 

Contact: Charla Brautigam, Communications/Public Relations Manager

cbrautigam@homerschools.org | 708-226-7628

 

For Immediate Release:

Nov. 17, 2016

Schilling School teachers, staff join Ronald McDonald at McCare Night

Raise money for Schilling PTO

 

If you happened to eat at the McDonald’s on Bell Road this week, you may have been served up by a few novices from Schilling School.

 

Teachers and staff, including Principal Candis Gasa, joined the McDonald’s crew on Nov. 16 to raise money for the school’s PTO.

 

They passed out burgers and fries from the drive-thru and even took a few orders from behind the counter.

 

Fifteen percent of the proceeds from each sale between 4 and 7 p.m. will go to support the school through its Parent Teacher Organization (PTO).

 

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Source: Will County News

How progressives changed Thanksgiving

by Lori
Wednesday, Nov 25, 2015 at 12:30 PM EST
Much of what we know about the first Thanksgiving comes from a letter written by Edward Winslow in 1621. The letter, lost for nearly 200 years, was discovered by Boston publisher Alexander Young and later published in 1841.
The first Thanksgiving, according to the account, was primarily a day of fasting to remember and thank God.
While George Washington held a Thanksgiving as president, it was Abraham Lincoln that made it a national holiday.
Right after the battle of Gettysburg, Lincoln declared Thanksgiving an annual day of remembrance to be observed the fourth Thursday of every November. From 1863 to 1939, Thanksgiving took place on the fourth Thursday, allowing people to stop and to give thanks to God.
As Glenn outlined on radio, the tie between Thanksgiving and God slowly unraveled during the Progressive Era.
In an official statement issued by Theodore Roosevelt, a subtle change in wording and tradition began the unraveling. “I, Theodore Roosevelt, president of the United States do hereby designate as a day of general thanksgiving, Thursday the 28th, this present November, and I recommend that throughout the land, people cease from their wanted occupations.”
“Notice the date was still the same [the fourth Thursday of November], but this is the first time the president said we should take the day off,” Glenn explained. “This was unusual because up until the Progressive Era, we thought it was abhorrent to take even Christmas off. …In fact, the Pilgrims and our Founders thought it would be crass to take the day off and make it not a day of work for either holiday, either Thanksgiving or Christmas. We worked on Christmas. But it was the progressives that wanted us to cease from occupations.”
Roosevelt’s statement went on to “thank the giver of all good for the countless blessings in our national life.” Glenn pointed out the subtle — but important — choice of words. The president used the word “national” rather than “individual.”
Woodrow Wilson issued a similar statement, urging citizens to take the day off.
“I, Woodrow Wilson, president of the United States, do hereby designate Thursday the 27th of November as a day of Thanksgiving and prayer and invite the people throughout the land to cease from their wanted occupations.”
At the beginning of the Depression in 1931, Herbert Hoover followed suit.
“I, therefore, Herbert Hoover, president of the United States, do hereby designate Thursday, November 26th, as the national day of Thanksgiving and recommend that our people rest from their daily labors, and in their homes and accustomed places of worship, give devout thanks for the blessings which a merciful Father have bestowed on all of us.”
Again, while most people wanted to work, a progressive president told them to stay home and rest. The most dramatic change happened in 1939 under Franklin Roosevelt.
“At the tail end of the Depression, Franklin Roosevelt, hoping to boost the economy by providing shoppers and merchants a few extra days to conduct their business between Thanksgiving and Christmas, moved Thanksgiving to November’s third Thursday,” explained Glenn. “So the only reason why we changed from the fourth Thursday to the third, was because in the third term of FDR, he officially disconnected it from God and connected it to the God of America, the almighty dollar.” The decision was not well received.
A Gallup poll at the time showed 59 percent of Americans disapproved of the date change. Twenty-two states decided to go along with Roosevelt’s plan. Twenty-three decided to stick with the old date, affirming Thanksgiving should be about thanking God, not shopping. Both dates were recognized by the press, the latter referred to as the Republican Thanksgiving because it was connected to God, the founding and Abraham Lincoln.
In 1941, the Wall Street Journal looked at a large pool of data and declared the move a bust. It provided no real boost to retail sales. Unfortunately, what it did do was further separate the American people and society from God. Just two years later, Roosevelt reversed his controversial decision, moving Thanksgiving back to the fourth Thursday in November.
Watch a segment from the program below:
Featured Image:

Constant Snow walks through the 1627 Pilgrim Village at ‘Plimoth Plantation’ where she and other role-players portray Pilgrims seven years after the arrival of the Mayflower November 17, 2005 in Plymouth, Massachusetts. The 17th century replica village was the site of the first Thanksgiving in 1623. Thanksgiving Day, believed to have originally taken place at the end of July, was established as a national holiday by U.S. President Abraham Lincoln in 1863 and is celebrated on the last Thursday of November. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Source: http://www.glennbeck.com/2015/11/25/how-progressives-changed-thanksgiving?utm_source=glennbeck&utm_medium=contentcopy_link

Source: Will County News