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School Feared American Flag Might Cause Post-Election Backlash

School Feared American Flag Might Cause Post-Election Backlash
11.19.16

Written by Todd Starnes

There’s trouble brewing in Lincoln, Nebraska where students at a public school were told they could not fly the American flag – because it might spark some sort of post-election backlash.

Several of my astute readers sent me a link to a story in the pages of the Lincoln Journal Star titled, “Safety concerns prompt school to ask students to not fly flags.”

On Veterans Day someone had pulled Old Glory off a flagpole on a students’ pickup truck at The Career Academy.  It’s unclear who was responsible for desecrating the flag, but the owner of the truck was concerned about a “potentially disruptive climate.”

The school district said that prompted the school’s administrators to “review the situation and make a determination that there would be potential for continued disruption.”

The Journal Star reported that administrators asked students not to fly the flag “out of an abundance of caution.”

Although, they did say they would “consider letting students fly the flags on another appropriate day, such as Presidents Day,” the newspaper reported.

As you might imagine, the flag ban did not go over very well in Lincoln – home to many God-loving patriots.

“We have heard from many students, families and community members who were concerned about taking away those rights,” the district said.

The outrage prompted the school district to hold a press conference on Nov. 17 to retract the ban and apologize.

“We want to make this very clear: Lincoln Public Schools students are free to fly their flags on their cars, and leave the flags on their vehicles during the school day,” the district said in a prepared statement.

They also reminded the general public of their patriotic bona fides – from reciting the Pledge of Allegiance to promoting Veterans Day.

“LPS believes in the teaching of the tenets of the Constitution and all it represents,” they stated.

“Hindsight would suggest that this could have been handled in a different way and we are amending our original decision,” the district said. “We respect the right for students to display their flags. We should not have asked our students to remove them.”

The district went on to say their flag ban “could easily and understandably have been misinterpreted as infringing on the rights of freedom of expression and speech.”

There was no misinterpretation — because it was an infringement – a shameful infringement.

Instead of cracking down on American patriotism, how about cracking down on people who desecrate the American flag? How about more discipline and less capitulation? Is that too much to ask from a public school these days?

Then again, this is the same school district that had a problem with teachers calling children boys and girls. They wanted the teachers to use more gender inclusive language.

I wonder what the gender inclusive word for stupid is – because there’s a whole mess of it in the public education system.


This article was originally posted at ToddStarnes.com

Source: Will County News

The Democrats’ real strategy in launching recounts

The Democrats’ real strategy in launching recounts

The recount in Wisconsin, and the coming ones in Michigan and Pennsylvania will not change the outcomes in any of the states.  No recount ever changes thousands of votes.  I do not think that is the purpose.

The recounts, if done by hand, which can be demanded, may take longer than the last day for completing the official counts in a state and directing Electoral College voters.  If all 3 states miss the deadline, Trump is at 260, Hillary at 232.  No one hits 270.

Then this goes to Congress, where the House voting 1 vote per state elects Trump, and Senate selects Pence. This would be first time this happened since 1824, but in that case, John Quincy Adams won in the House, though he had fewer electoral college votes than Andrew Jackson.

If this goes to the US House and Senate, and the result is the same as result from the Electoral College without the recounts, why do it?  The answer is to make Trump seem even more illegitimate, that he did not win the popular vote  (he lost by over 2.1 million), he did not win the Electoral College (did not reach 270), and was elected by being inserted into the presidency by members of his own party in Congress.

The recount in Wisconsin, and the coming ones in Michigan and Pennsylvania will not change the outcomes in any of the states.  No recount ever changes thousands of votes.  I do not think that is the purpose.

The recounts, if done by hand, which can be demanded, may take longer than the last day for completing the official counts in a state and directing Electoral College voters.  If all 3 states miss the deadline, Trump is at 260, Hillary at 232.  No one hits 270.

Then this goes to Congress, where the House voting 1 vote per state elects Trump, and Senate selects Pence. This would be first time this happened since 1824, but in that case, John Quincy Adams won in the House, though he had fewer electoral college votes than Andrew Jackson.

If this goes to the US House and Senate, and the result is the same as result from the Electoral College without the recounts, why do it?  The answer is to make Trump seem even more illegitimate, that he did not win the popular vote  (he lost by over 2.1 million), he did not win the Electoral College (did not reach 270), and was elected by being inserted into the presidency by members of his own party in Congress.

Read more: http://www.americanthinker.com/blog/2016/11/the_democrats_real_strategy_in_launching_recounts.html#ixzz4REYdfVkD

Source: Will County News

Illinois’ wealth flight explained in 4 graphics

Illinois Policy November 15th 2016

IRS data show the average income of taxpayers leaving Illinois surpassed the average income of taxpayers entering the state by $20,000 in 2014, a record loss for Illinois in the wake of the 2011 income-tax hike.

Politicians enacted Illinois’ 2011 income-tax hike during a late-night legislative session in January 2011 and raised the state’s personal income-tax rate to 5 percent from 3 percent. This 67 percent income-tax hike lasted for four years, during which time Illinois experienced record wealth flight.

IRS data reveal what happens when politicians choose short-term tax revenue gains over long-term stability. The short-term increase in tax revenue gained from higher tax rates is offset by the long-term loss of substantial portions of Illinois’ tax base.

The average income of taxpayers leaving Illinois rose to $77,000 per year in 2014, according to new income migration data released by the IRS. Meanwhile, the average income of people entering Illinois was only $57,000. 2014’s $20,000 difference in average income between people who left Illinois and people who entered the state is the highest on record. And this divergence between out-migrating and in-migrating income began widening significantly in the wake of the 2011 tax hikes.

illinois outmigration

The IRS income migration data span back to 1995, and show how the migration of earning power out of Illinois has changed over time. From 1995 to 2010, the difference between the earning power of Illinoisans who moved out and people who moved in was $5,350. This spread dipped to $3,000 in tax year 1996, then climbed to $7,000 in tax year 2000.

But that income differential increased dramatically after the 2011 tax hikes. In tax year 2010, the last year before the tax hike, the differential was $5,900. The difference jumped to $9,700 in 2011; $14,300 in 2012; $13,700 in 2013; and $20,100 in 2014.

illinois outmigration wealth flight

During the four years of the full income-tax hike, prior to its partial sunset in 2015, Illinois lost $14 billion in annual adjusted gross income, or AGI, to other states, on net. The out-migration of income cost Illinois $2.7 billion in 2011, $3.9 billion in 2012, $4.2 billion in 2013, and $3.4 billion in 2014. That compares with an average annual loss of $2.2 billion of AGI per year over the 16 years prior to the tax hike.

illinois outmigration wealth flight

Illinois has America’s worst differential between the average income of people who leave the state and the average income of people who enter the state. Behind Illinois’ $20,000 income differential were Connecticut with a $16,000 income differential; Kansas at $12,000; and Ohio and Washington, D.C., each with an $11,600 income differential.

illinois outmigration

By contrast, the top five states with favorable income differentials were Florida, Wyoming, Nevada, South Carolina and Texas. Notably, 4 of 5 of these states have no income tax, and none of them have a death tax.

Illinois faces limitations in addressing its ongoing fiscal crisis in light of the fact that higher-income Illinoisans are opting out of Illinois residency. Further tax hikes will push these people out even faster. Rather, Illinois politicians have to rein in their spending habits.

And Illinois needs to remove the most obvious tax driver of high-income out-migration: the state’s death tax. If political leaders push through another income-tax hike as a temporary Band-Aid for the state’s fiscal crisis, they should also repeal the death tax as part of the process. The possibility of a repeal of the federal death tax and the increasing mobility of wealth and income across state borders will put even more pressure on states that still impose this tax.

Illinois policymakers need to confront the loss of wealth that followed the 2011 tax hike, which is likely still ongoing. Politicians must reckon with the fact that they have overspent and overpromised, and seek solutions that focus on reduced spending and more economic growth.

TAGS: IRS: Internal Revenue Service, outmigration

Source: Will County News